Fred Hampton: a True Revolutionary

Categories, Revolutionary, THEIRstory

fred hampton

“So we say — we always say in the Black Panther Party that they can do anything they want to us. We might not be back. I might be in jail, I might be anywhere. But when I leave, you’ll remember I said, with the last words on my lips, that I am a revolutionary. And you’re going to have to keep on saying that. You’re going to have to say that I am the proletariat, I am the people.”

-Fred Hampton, former Captain of the Chicago Black Panthers, (1948 – 1969)

Biography:

Here is a short biography I wrote on the 46th Anniversary of Fred Hampton’s assassination.

Rest in Power, Brother Fred, taken too soon but you never will be forgotten. Let his life be a lesson: young Black revolutionaries are the most feared organizers to power in the United States history. His commitment to abolishing the pig-power structure should, if not already, be a wake up call for all those committed to Ferguson organizing.

“It is our duty to fight! It is our duty to win! We have nothing to lose but our chains!” -Assata Shakur

Fred Hampton, captain and early member of the Chicago chapter of the Black Panther Party (BPP), highly regarded, as one of the best organizers within the BPP ranks. He was instrumental in first implementing the Free Breakfast program for Chicago children, many medical programs, such as helping to build health centers, door-to-door services to test for “Sickle Cell Anemia”, and organizing blood drives for a local hospital, in the Black community. Even more impressive was how he “negotiated” a peace-pact between local street gangs (Rainbow Coalition/PUSH) to end their fighting and initiate a class war against the racist, capitalist, imperialist US, he, and subsequently, the Chicago chapter, were hugely successful.

Until that is,the fateful day of, December 4th, 1969, FBI agents discovered an apartment harboring BPP members, including Hampton. At 4:00 AM, Chicago police raid the apartment–and inevitably kill Fred Hampton as he slept. He was shot 4 times, at deadly range, and the pigs who killed him also took the lives of 3 other Panthers, he was assassinated at the age of 21.

His death, among many factors, became a major factor in the demise of the BPP and–the worst part was that none of the pigs who did any of the killings faced any jail time, or fear of repercussion. A minor testament to his legacy, and impact, his funeral procession was attended by over 5,000 people–with most of Black Chicagoans in consensus, that he was so well loved for his undying commitment to the Black community. RIP.